Trading on margin is extremely popular among retail Forex traders. It allows you to open a much larger position than your initial trading account would otherwise allow, by allocating only a small portion of your trading account as the margin, or collateral for the trade. Trading on margin also carries certain risks, as both your profits and losses are magnified.
I post this to let you know, as the title mentions it, that I made a trading diary, with google documents tool. This a generic spreadsheet which allows any trader to manage his trading (his risk, his pnl, his opened position, the orders...) with a trding diary. Every trader,should have one, and I mad mine with google docs. At least you must have an account to acces this spreadsheet.
An extremely important requested feature for QSForex has been the ability to backtest over multiple days. Previously the system only supported backtesting via a single file. This was not a scalable solution as such a file must be read into memory and subsequently into a Pandas DataFrame. While the tick data files produced are not huge (roughly 3.5Mb each), they do add up quickly if we consider multiple pairs over periods of months or more.

Trading on margin can be a profitable Forex strategy, but it is important to understand all the possible risks. You should make sure you know how your margin account operates, and be sure to read the margin agreement between you and your selected broker. If there is anything you are unclear about in your agreement, ask questions and make sure everything is clear.
Brokers use margin levels in an attempt to detect whether FX traders can take any new positions or not. Different brokers have varying limits for the margin level, but most will set this limit at 100%. This limit is called a margin call level. Technically, a 100% margin call level means that when your account margin level reaches 100%, you can still close your positions, but you cannot take any new positions.
Forex trading is the largest market in the world, with nearly $2 trillion traded on a daily basis. There are many factors that can contribute to changes in the value of a currency. Some of these factors include terms of trade, sometimes referred to as the balance of trade, which is when there's an improvement in the terms of the trade thanks to the price of a country's exports being higher than the prices of its imports. Other facts include differences in inflation rates, which basically involve the value of the currency, and public debt, which typically occurs when foreign investors lose confidence in the economy and make fewer or no investments and leads to inflation and devaluation of the home country's currency.
In addition, I've had some comments from people suggesting that they'd like to see more varied order types than the simple Market Order. For carrying out proper HFT strategies against OANDA we are going to need to use Limit Orders. This will probably require a reworking of how the system currently executes trades, but it will allow a much bigger universe of trading strategies to be carried out.
Retail or beginning traders often trade currency in micro lots, because one pip in a micro lot represents only a 10-cent move in the price. This makes losses easier to manage if a trade doesn't produce the intended results. In a mini lot, one pip equals $1 and that same one pip in a standard lot equals $10. Some currencies move as much as 100 pips or more in a single trading session making the potential losses to the small investor much more manageable by trading in micro or mini lots. 
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