Risk Disclosure: Trading in financial instruments and/or cryptocurrencies involves high risks including the risk of losing some, or all, of your investment amount, and may not be suitable for all investors. Prices of cryptocurrencies are extremely volatile and may be affected by external factors such as financial, regulatory or political events. Trading on margin increases the financial risks.
tweet at 11:32am: #OOTT | Russian OilMin Novak: Ready To Meet #OPEC+ In February - IFX tweet at 11:35am: Novak: seriously discussing with Saudi Arabia about lower oil demand due to #Coronavirus. Russia ready to act if necessary to rebalance #oil market. Need several more day sto monitor the situation. #WTI back to 52$ #OOTT tweet at 11:38am: RUSSIA'S NOVAK SAYS OPEC+ MAY REACT IF THERE ARE SIGNIFICANT CONSEQUENCES TO OIL MARKET DUE TO CORONAVIRUS - RIA NOVAK SAYS RUSSIA'S READY TO REACT TO DECREASE IN DEMAND FOR OIL - IFAX #OOTT Follow the story live: https://t.co/m2JBwOmVug
Factors like interest rates, trade flows, tourism, economic strength, and geopolitical risk affect supply and demand for currencies, which creates daily volatility in the forex markets. An opportunity exists to profit from changes that may increase or reduce one currency's value compared to another. A forecast that one currency will weaken is essentially the same as assuming that the other currency in the pair will strengthen because currencies are traded as pairs.
One unique aspect of this international market is that there is no central marketplace for foreign exchange. Rather, currency trading is conducted electronically over-the-counter (OTC), which means that all transactions occur via computer networks between traders around the world, rather than on one centralized exchange. The market is open 24 hours a day, five and a half days a week, and currencies are traded worldwide in the major financial centers of London, New York, Tokyo, Zurich, Frankfurt, Hong Kong, Singapore, Paris and Sydney—across almost every time zone. This means that when the trading day in the U.S. ends, the forex market begins anew in Tokyo and Hong Kong. As such, the forex market can be extremely active any time of the day, with price quotes changing constantly.
Most retail investors should spend time investigating a forex dealer to find out whether it is regulated in the U.S. or the U.K. (dealers in the U.S. and U.K. have more oversight) or in a country with lax rules and oversight. It is also a good idea to find out what kind of account protections are available in case of a market crisis, or if a dealer becomes insolvent.
Probably the most important tip I can give you is to accept the fact that some trades are just going to lose. There is nothing you can do about that. Every trader has losing trades. It is part of the forex game, forex is a game, there are buyers and sellers, and our job is to pick the right side. We can't always do it, but if we enter trades with at least 3 strong technical & fundamental reasons, then we give ourselves the best chance to succeed in the long run.
GBP/USD bounced off support yesterday just prior to the BoE, and drove further higher in the wake of the meeting. The rally doesn’t mean much so far, though, as price remains well contained within a developing wedge that is seen as leading a meaningful move soon. A break above 13173 could get the upside going, while a break below 12954 may perhaps be even ...
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