Fear – Traders become fearful of entering the market usually when they are new to trading and have not yet mastered an effective trading strategy like price action trading (in which case they should not be trading real money yet anyways). Fear can also arise in a trader after they hit a series of losing trades or after suffering a loss larger than what they are emotionally capable of absorbing. To conquer fear of the market, you primarily have to make sure you are never risking more money than you are totally OK with losing on a trade. If you are totally OK with losing the amount of money you have at risk, there is nothing to fear. Fear can be a very limiting emotion to a trader because it can make them miss out on good trading opportunities.

Since the market is made by each of the participating banks providing offers and bids for a particular currency, the market pricing mechanism is based on supply and demand. Because there are such large trade flows within the system, it is difficult for rogue traders to influence the price of a currency. This system helps create transparency in the market for investors with access to interbank dealing.
This is great, as the markets are open so long, we can enter or close a trade whenever we need to, whereas if you were trading stocks on the NYSE you can only trade during market hours, and once the market is closed you have to wait until the next trading day to trade your position. This forex help tip can really save you when there is a big unexpected political or news release and you need to close your position right away.
The Aussie dollar is very dependent on the price of gold, as Australia is the 2nd largest gold producer in the world. If gold prices fall, this means Australia is getting less money for that gold, and generally the Aussie dollar will weaken in these circumstances. If gold prices rise this is great for Australia and their dollar will normally strengthen with the rise in the price of gold.
Election year historical data is a good base for identifying the range of outcomes for this year as 2020 is an election year. The data below shows the historical data, which may be relevant to how 2020 might shape up. Given the many unknowns in 2020 (impeachment, trade war truce, economy and the outcome of the election itself), this year is especially ...
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