Leveraged trading in foreign currency or off-exchange products on margin carries significant risk and may not be suitable for all investors. We advise you to carefully consider whether trading is appropriate for you based on your personal circumstances. Forex trading involves risk. Losses can exceed deposits. We recommend that you seek independent advice and ensure you fully understand the risks involved before trading.
All forex transactions include two currencies, because you are betting on the value of one currency against another. Think of EUR / USD, the best-selling currency pair in the world. EUR, the first currency in the pair, is the base, and USD, the second, is the counter. When you see the price indicated on your platform, this price is equal to the value of one euro in US dollars. You always see two prices, because one is the purchase price and the other is the sale. The difference between the two is in distribution. When you click buy or sell, you buy or sell the first currency in a pair.
However, being able to push this fear aside and work through it is absolutely vital for any trader who wants to be successful. Practice trading, make notes, research new strategies and make mistakes. Trial and error is a massive part of the Forex learning curve, and generations of traders have proved that this is the most effective way to eliminate trading fears.
The problem is that this is where traders are most likely to succumb to overconfidence bias. It's not uncommon for traders to complete a winning streak and then believe that they can't get anything wrong in the future. To believe this is of course unwise, and is only going to end in failure. Make sure you always analyse your trading sessions and look at your wins and losses in detail.

Imagine a trader who expects interest rates to rise in the U.S. compared to Australia while the exchange rate between the two currencies (AUD/USD) is 0.71 (it takes $0.71 USD to buy $1.00 AUD). The trader believes higher interest rates in the U.S. will increase demand for USD, and therefore the AUD/USD exchange rate will fall because it will require fewer, stronger USD to buy an AUD.


Paul Tudor Jones II was born in Memphis, Tennessee. In 1976 he earned a bachelor’s degree in economics from the University of Virginia. He was accepted to Harvard Business School in the 1980’s but he did not enroll. PTJ was a commodities broker for E. F. Hutton & Co between 1976-1980. PTJ was mentored by cotton trader Eli Tullis. Tullis was a representative ...
When you trade forex, you actually borrow the first currency in a pair to buy or sell a second currency. With a market of $ 5 trillion per day, liquidity is so great that liquidity providers — mostly large banks — allow you to trade with leverage. To trade with leverage, you simply set aside the necessary margin for your transaction size. For example, if you trade with a 200: 1 leverage, you can trade £ 2,000 in the market, leaving only 10 pounds on margin on your trading account. For a leverage of 50: 1, the same transaction size still requires a margin of around £ 40. This gives you a lot more options while
Most retail investors should spend time investigating a forex dealer to find out whether it is regulated in the U.S. or the U.K. (dealers in the U.S. and U.K. have more oversight) or in a country with lax rules and oversight. It is also a good idea to find out what kind of account protections are available in case of a market crisis, or if a dealer becomes insolvent.
Probably the most important tip I can give you is to accept the fact that some trades are just going to lose. There is nothing you can do about that. Every trader has losing trades. It is part of the forex game, forex is a game, there are buyers and sellers, and our job is to pick the right side. We can't always do it, but if we enter trades with at least 3 strong technical & fundamental reasons, then we give ourselves the best chance to succeed in the long run.

Greed – There’s an old saying that you may have heard regarding trading the markets, it goes something like this: “Bulls make money, bears make money, and pigs get slaughtered”. It basically means that if you are a greedy “pig” in the markets, you are almost certainly going to lose your money. Traders are greedy when they don’t take profits because they think a trade is going to go forever in their favor. Another thing that greedy traders do is add to a position simply because the market has moved in their favor, you can add to your trades if you do so for logical price action-based reasons, but doing so only because the market has moved in your favor a little bit, is usually an action born out of greed. Obviously, risking too much on a trade from the very start is a greedy thing to do too. The point here is that you need to be very careful of greed, because it can sneak up on you and quickly destroy your trading account.
Loss aversion bias derives from the prospect theory. Humans have a funny way of evaluating their gains and losses, along with comparing their perceived meanings against each other. For example, when considering our options before making a choice, we are more willing to give preference to a lower possible loss over a higher possible reward. Fear is a much more powerful motivator than greed. In practice, a trader with a loss bias is more akin to cutting profits when they are still low, while allowing bigger drawdowns.
You need to become an organized trader. If there is something that is the “glue” that holds all of the points I’ve discussed in this part together, it is being an organized trader. By organized, I mean having a trading plan and a trading journal and actually using both of them consistently. You need to think of Forex trading like a business instead of like a trip to the casino. Be calm and calculating in all your interactions with the market and you should have no problem keeping the emotional trading demons at bay.
Unlike stock markets, which can trace their roots back centuries, the forex market as we understand it today is a truly new market. Of course, in its most basic sense—that of people converting one currency to another for financial advantage—forex has been around since nations began minting currencies. But the modern forex markets are a modern invention. After the accord at Bretton Woods in 1971, more major currencies were allowed to float freely against one another. The values of individual currencies vary, which has given rise to the need for foreign exchange services and trading.
It's easy for traders to feel confident in their ability to remain calm and collected during their trading sessions before the market opens. However, once the clock starts it's a different story. When faced with real financial decisions, it's very easy for emotions to come into play. We can't avoid our emotions, but we can learn to work around them.
The 2nd method is by performing a carry trade, where you can profit by buying a currency with a higher interest rate, and selling a currency with a lower interest rate. An example of this would be the USD/CHF (Swiss franc). If you buy USD/CHF, you are buying the USD, and their interest rates are higher than Swiss interest rates, so if you hold the position overnight, every day you hold the trade you will make money, and the money will be deposited in your brokerage account.
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