Traders in the investment management and banking industries have formally called for market trading hours to be reduced by 90-minutes to seven hours.Responding to the London Stock Exchange’s (LSE) consultation on the issue, the Association for Financial Markets in Europe (AFME) and the Investment Association (IA) are continuing their campaign for a ...
If your weekend plans include dropping a bet on the Super Bowl, don’t forget that Uncle Sam wants a piece of anything you win. Americans are expected to wager about $6.8 billion on Sunday night’s matchup between the Kansas City Chiefs and San Francisco 49ers in Miami. And no matter where you place your bet — whether at a casino, online, through a pool or ...
Paul Tudor Jones II was born in Memphis, Tennessee. In 1976 he earned a bachelor’s degree in economics from the University of Virginia. He was accepted to Harvard Business School in the 1980’s but he did not enroll. PTJ was a commodities broker for E. F. Hutton & Co between 1976-1980. PTJ was mentored by cotton trader Eli Tullis. Tullis was a representative ...
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This is the only way you can really stay on top of your trading. Allow yourself to make mistakes - and don't make the mistake of being scared to prove yourself wrong - you'll be in a much better position for it in the long run. You have to be comfortable with accepting that mistakes are inevitable, especially in the early stages. It's all part of the learning curve.
This is great, as the markets are open so long, we can enter or close a trade whenever we need to, whereas if you were trading stocks on the NYSE you can only trade during market hours, and once the market is closed you have to wait until the next trading day to trade your position. This forex help tip can really save you when there is a big unexpected political or news release and you need to close your position right away.
There are actually three ways that institutions, corporations and individuals trade forex: the spot market, the forwards market, and the futures market. Forex trading in the spot market has always been the largest market because it is the "underlying" real asset that the forwards and futures markets are based on. In the past, the futures market was the most popular venue for traders because it was available to individual investors for a longer period of time. However, with the advent of electronic trading and numerous forex brokers, the spot market has witnessed a huge surge in activity and now surpasses the futures market as the preferred trading market for individual investors and speculators. When people refer to the forex market, they usually are referring to the spot market. The forwards and futures markets tend to be more popular with companies that need to hedge their foreign exchange risks out to a specific date in the future.
Fear – Traders become fearful of entering the market usually when they are new to trading and have not yet mastered an effective trading strategy like price action trading (in which case they should not be trading real money yet anyways). Fear can also arise in a trader after they hit a series of losing trades or after suffering a loss larger than what they are emotionally capable of absorbing. To conquer fear of the market, you primarily have to make sure you are never risking more money than you are totally OK with losing on a trade. If you are totally OK with losing the amount of money you have at risk, there is nothing to fear. Fear can be a very limiting emotion to a trader because it can make them miss out on good trading opportunities.
Greed – There’s an old saying that you may have heard regarding trading the markets, it goes something like this: “Bulls make money, bears make money, and pigs get slaughtered”. It basically means that if you are a greedy “pig” in the markets, you are almost certainly going to lose your money. Traders are greedy when they don’t take profits because they think a trade is going to go forever in their favor. Another thing that greedy traders do is add to a position simply because the market has moved in their favor, you can add to your trades if you do so for logical price action-based reasons, but doing so only because the market has moved in your favor a little bit, is usually an action born out of greed. Obviously, risking too much on a trade from the very start is a greedy thing to do too. The point here is that you need to be very careful of greed, because it can sneak up on you and quickly destroy your trading account.
This material does not contain and should not be construed as containing investment advice, investment recommendations, an offer of or solicitation for any transactions in financial instruments. Please note that such trading analysis is not a reliable indicator for any current or future performance, as circumstances may change over time. Before making any investment decisions, you should seek advice from independent financial advisors to ensure you understand the risks.
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