An investor can profit from the difference between two interest rates in two different economies by buying the currency with the higher interest rate and shorting the currency with the lower interest rate. Prior to the 2008 financial crisis, it was very common to short the Japanese yen (JPY) and buy British pounds (GBP) because the interest rate differential was very large. This strategy is sometimes referred to as a "carry trade."
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The content has been prepared by Traders4Traders Inc, which is the training arm of T4TCapital, for general information and educational purposes only and is not (and cannot be construed or relied upon as) personal advice nor as an offer to buy/sell/subscribe to any of the financial products mentioned herein. No investment objectives, financial circumstances or needs of any individual have been taken into consideration in the preparation or delivery of the content. Financial products are complex, entail risk of loss, may rise and fall, and are impacted by a range of market and economic factors, and you should always obtain professional advice to ensure trading or investing in forex instruments is suitable for your circumstances, and ensure you obtain, read and understand any applicable offer document.

A jump in the pound just before the Bank of England's rates decision was announced will be investigated by the markets' watchdog. The Financial Conduct Authority said it is "looking into" claims that some currency buyers might have known the decision before it was made public at midday on Thursday. Before the Bank announced its intention to hold rates at ...
Since the market is made by each of the participating banks providing offers and bids for a particular currency, the market pricing mechanism is based on supply and demand. Because there are such large trade flows within the system, it is difficult for rogue traders to influence the price of a currency. This system helps create transparency in the market for investors with access to interbank dealing.
One unique aspect of this international market is that there is no central marketplace for foreign exchange. Rather, currency trading is conducted electronically over-the-counter (OTC), which means that all transactions occur via computer networks between traders around the world, rather than on one centralized exchange. The market is open 24 hours a day, five and a half days a week, and currencies are traded worldwide in the major financial centers of London, New York, Tokyo, Zurich, Frankfurt, Hong Kong, Singapore, Paris and Sydney—across almost every time zone. This means that when the trading day in the U.S. ends, the forex market begins anew in Tokyo and Hong Kong. As such, the forex market can be extremely active any time of the day, with price quotes changing constantly.
Since the market is made by each of the participating banks providing offers and bids for a particular currency, the market pricing mechanism is based on supply and demand. Because there are such large trade flows within the system, it is difficult for rogue traders to influence the price of a currency. This system helps create transparency in the market for investors with access to interbank dealing. 
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