In the futures market, futures contracts are bought and sold based upon a standard size and settlement date on public commodities markets, such as the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. In the U.S., the National Futures Association regulates the futures market. Futures contracts have specific details, including the number of units being traded, delivery and settlement dates, and minimum price increments that cannot be customized. The exchange acts as a counterpart to the trader, providing clearance and settlement.
Challenge: Banks, brokers, and dealers in the forex markets allow a high amount of leverage, which means that traders can control large positions with relatively little money of their own. Leverage in the range of 100:1 is a high ratio but not uncommon in forex. A trader must understand the use of leverage and the risks that leverage introduces in an account. Extreme amounts of leverage have led to many dealers becoming insolvent unexpectedly.
GBP/USD bounced off support yesterday just prior to the BoE, and drove further higher in the wake of the meeting. The rally doesn’t mean much so far, though, as price remains well contained within a developing wedge that is seen as leading a meaningful move soon. A break above 13173 could get the upside going, while a break below 12954 may perhaps be even ...

GBPCAD has gained this week but it managed to still hold within the Ichimoku cloud in the daily timeframe. The price ran to a fresh six-week peak today at 1.7376, climbing above 1.7340, which is the 23.6% Fibonacci retracement level of the upward wave from 1.5875 to 1.7790, following the rebound off the six-month uptrend line. The technical indicators are ...
If your weekend plans include dropping a bet on the Super Bowl, don’t forget that Uncle Sam wants a piece of anything you win. Americans are expected to wager about $6.8 billion on Sunday night’s matchup between the Kansas City Chiefs and San Francisco 49ers in Miami. And no matter where you place your bet — whether at a casino, online, through a pool or ...
It's easy for traders to feel confident in their ability to remain calm and collected during their trading sessions before the market opens. However, once the clock starts it's a different story. When faced with real financial decisions, it's very easy for emotions to come into play. We can't avoid our emotions, but we can learn to work around them.

You need to become an organized trader. If there is something that is the “glue” that holds all of the points I’ve discussed in this part together, it is being an organized trader. By organized, I mean having a trading plan and a trading journal and actually using both of them consistently. You need to think of Forex trading like a business instead of like a trip to the casino. Be calm and calculating in all your interactions with the market and you should have no problem keeping the emotional trading demons at bay.


Currency trading was very difficult for individual investors prior to the internet. Most currency traders were large multinational corporations, hedge funds or high-net-worth individuals because forex trading required a lot of capital. With help from the internet, a retail market aimed at individual traders has emerged, providing easy access to the foreign exchange markets, either through the banks themselves or brokers making a secondary market. Most online brokers or dealers offer very high leverage to individual traders who can control a large trade with a small account balance.
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