One unique aspect of this international market is that there is no central marketplace for foreign exchange. Rather, currency trading is conducted electronically over-the-counter (OTC), which means that all transactions occur via computer networks between traders around the world, rather than on one centralized exchange. The market is open 24 hours a day, five and a half days a week, and currencies are traded worldwide in the major financial centers of London, New York, Tokyo, Zurich, Frankfurt, Hong Kong, Singapore, Paris and Sydney—across almost every time zone. This means that when the trading day in the U.S. ends, the forex market begins anew in Tokyo and Hong Kong. As such, the forex market can be extremely active any time of the day, with price quotes changing constantly.
Most retail investors should spend time investigating a forex dealer to find out whether it is regulated in the U.S. or the U.K. (dealers in the U.S. and U.K. have more oversight) or in a country with lax rules and oversight. It is also a good idea to find out what kind of account protections are available in case of a market crisis, or if a dealer becomes insolvent.

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You need to always manage your risk properly. If you do not control your risk on EVERY single trade, you open the door for emotional trading to take hold of your mind, and I can promise you that once you start down the slippery slope of emotional Forex trading, it CAN be very hard to stop your slide, or even recognize that you are trading emotionally in the first place. You can largely eliminate the possibility of becoming an overly-emotional trader by only risking an amount of money per trade that you are 100% OK with losing. You should EXPECT TO LOSE on any given trade, that way you are always aware of the very real possibility of it actually happening.
Loss aversion bias derives from the prospect theory. Humans have a funny way of evaluating their gains and losses, along with comparing their perceived meanings against each other. For example, when considering our options before making a choice, we are more willing to give preference to a lower possible loss over a higher possible reward. Fear is a much more powerful motivator than greed. In practice, a trader with a loss bias is more akin to cutting profits when they are still low, while allowing bigger drawdowns.
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Forex trading psychology is a big thing. Often, it is the psychology, and not a lack of academic knowledge or skill in application, that is considered to be the primary originator of trading mistakes. Mistakes are constantly repeated by financial traders of various national, cultural, and social backgrounds, which suggests that it is the common traits shared among us as humans that lie in the base of those mistakes.
Paul Tudor Jones II was born in Memphis, Tennessee. In 1976 he earned a bachelor’s degree in economics from the University of Virginia. He was accepted to Harvard Business School in the 1980’s but he did not enroll. PTJ was a commodities broker for E. F. Hutton & Co between 1976-1980. PTJ was mentored by cotton trader Eli Tullis. Tullis was a representative ...
Election year historical data is a good base for identifying the range of outcomes for this year as 2020 is an election year. The data below shows the historical data, which may be relevant to how 2020 might shape up. Given the many unknowns in 2020 (impeachment, trade war truce, economy and the outcome of the election itself), this year is especially ...
That common trait is fear, which creates the 'fight or flight' response in humans. Unfortunately, it is this fight or flight response which can cause the downfall of many traders. We cannot change what we have evolved to feel over millions of years, but we can change how we approach these feelings, by studying the psychology of successful Forex traders and then applying the findings. Today, we will look at how we should behave and respond to trading situations from the correct Forex trading psychology point of view.
A jump in the pound just before the Bank of England's rates decision was announced will be investigated by the markets' watchdog. The Financial Conduct Authority said it is "looking into" claims that some currency buyers might have known the decision before it was made public at midday on Thursday. Before the Bank announced its intention to hold rates at ...
Forex trading psychology is a big thing. Often, it is the psychology, and not a lack of academic knowledge or skill in application, that is considered to be the primary originator of trading mistakes. Mistakes are constantly repeated by financial traders of various national, cultural, and social backgrounds, which suggests that it is the common traits shared among us as humans that lie in the base of those mistakes.
Confirmation bias is the one factor that is most common amongst professional traders. Looking for information that will support a decision you have made, even if it wasn't the best decision, is simply a way of justifying your actions and strategies. The problem is that by doing this, you're not actually improving your methods, and you're just going to keep making the same trading mistakes. Unfortunately, this can create an infinite loop in Forex trading psychology that can be difficult to break.
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