Paul Tudor Jones II was born in Memphis, Tennessee. In 1976 he earned a bachelor’s degree in economics from the University of Virginia. He was accepted to Harvard Business School in the 1980’s but he did not enroll. PTJ was a commodities broker for E. F. Hutton & Co between 1976-1980. PTJ was mentored by cotton trader Eli Tullis. Tullis was a representative ...
Probably the most important tip I can give you is to accept the fact that some trades are just going to lose. There is nothing you can do about that. Every trader has losing trades. It is part of the forex game, forex is a game, there are buyers and sellers, and our job is to pick the right side. We can't always do it, but if we enter trades with at least 3 strong technical & fundamental reasons, then we give ourselves the best chance to succeed in the long run.
In the futures market, futures contracts are bought and sold based upon a standard size and settlement date on public commodities markets, such as the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. In the U.S., the National Futures Association regulates the futures market. Futures contracts have specific details, including the number of units being traded, delivery and settlement dates, and minimum price increments that cannot be customized. The exchange acts as a counterpart to the trader, providing clearance and settlement.

The blender company could have reduced this risk by shorting the euro and buying the USD when they were at parity. That way, if the dollar rose in value, the profits from the trade would offset the reduced profit from the sale of blenders. If the USD fell in value, the more favorable exchange rate will increase the profit from the sale of blenders, which offsets the losses in the trade. 

However, this can steer you away from a carefully planned trading strategy. Even worse, it could cause you to make rash decisions, with the hope of turning that losing trade around, causing you to lose much more money than you would have if you had just left it to play out. Instead of focusing on the long term plan, your mind wants to focus on making the best out of this short term losing position.


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The content has been prepared by Traders4Traders Inc, which is the training arm of T4TCapital, for general information and educational purposes only and is not (and cannot be construed or relied upon as) personal advice nor as an offer to buy/sell/subscribe to any of the financial products mentioned herein. No investment objectives, financial circumstances or needs of any individual have been taken into consideration in the preparation or delivery of the content. Financial products are complex, entail risk of loss, may rise and fall, and are impacted by a range of market and economic factors, and you should always obtain professional advice to ensure trading or investing in forex instruments is suitable for your circumstances, and ensure you obtain, read and understand any applicable offer document.
Risk warning: Trading Forex (foreign exchange) or CFDs (contracts for difference) on margin carries a high level of risk and may not be suitable for all investors. There is a possibility that you may sustain a loss equal to or greater than your entire investment. Therefore, you should not invest or risk money that you cannot afford to lose. Before using Admiral Markets UK Ltd, Admiral Markets Cyprus Ltd or Admiral Markets PTY Ltd services, please acknowledge all of the risks associated with trading.

This is great, as the markets are open so long, we can enter or close a trade whenever we need to, whereas if you were trading stocks on the NYSE you can only trade during market hours, and once the market is closed you have to wait until the next trading day to trade your position. This forex help tip can really save you when there is a big unexpected political or news release and you need to close your position right away. 

When you trade forex, you actually borrow the first currency in a pair to buy or sell a second currency. With a market of $ 5 trillion per day, liquidity is so great that liquidity providers — mostly large banks — allow you to trade with leverage. To trade with leverage, you simply set aside the necessary margin for your transaction size. For example, if you trade with a 200: 1 leverage, you can trade £ 2,000 in the market, leaving only 10 pounds on margin on your trading account. For a leverage of 50: 1, the same transaction size still requires a margin of around £ 40. This gives you a lot more options while
Risk Disclosure: Trading in financial instruments and/or cryptocurrencies involves high risks including the risk of losing some, or all, of your investment amount, and may not be suitable for all investors. Prices of cryptocurrencies are extremely volatile and may be affected by external factors such as financial, regulatory or political events. Trading on margin increases the financial risks.
Probably the most important tip I can give you is to accept the fact that some trades are just going to lose. There is nothing you can do about that. Every trader has losing trades. It is part of the forex game, forex is a game, there are buyers and sellers, and our job is to pick the right side. We can't always do it, but if we enter trades with at least 3 strong technical & fundamental reasons, then we give ourselves the best chance to succeed in the long run.
Since the market is made by each of the participating banks providing offers and bids for a particular currency, the market pricing mechanism is based on supply and demand. Because there are such large trade flows within the system, it is difficult for rogue traders to influence the price of a currency. This system helps create transparency in the market for investors with access to interbank dealing.
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