One unique aspect of this international market is that there is no central marketplace for foreign exchange. Rather, currency trading is conducted electronically over-the-counter (OTC), which means that all transactions occur via computer networks between traders around the world, rather than on one centralized exchange. The market is open 24 hours a day, five and a half days a week, and currencies are traded worldwide in the major financial centers of London, New York, Tokyo, Zurich, Frankfurt, Hong Kong, Singapore, Paris and Sydney—across almost every time zone. This means that when the trading day in the U.S. ends, the forex market begins anew in Tokyo and Hong Kong. As such, the forex market can be extremely active any time of the day, with price quotes changing constantly.
All forex transactions include two currencies, because you are betting on the value of one currency against another. Think of EUR / USD, the best-selling currency pair in the world. EUR, the first currency in the pair, is the base, and USD, the second, is the counter. When you see the price indicated on your platform, this price is equal to the value of one euro in US dollars. You always see two prices, because one is the purchase price and the other is the sale. The difference between the two is in distribution. When you click buy or sell, you buy or sell the first currency in a pair.
The 2nd method is by performing a carry trade, where you can profit by buying a currency with a higher interest rate, and selling a currency with a lower interest rate. An example of this would be the USD/CHF (Swiss franc). If you buy USD/CHF, you are buying the USD, and their interest rates are higher than Swiss interest rates, so if you hold the position overnight, every day you hold the trade you will make money, and the money will be deposited in your brokerage account.

Traders in the investment management and banking industries have formally called for market trading hours to be reduced by 90-minutes to seven hours.Responding to the London Stock Exchange’s (LSE) consultation on the issue, the Association for Financial Markets in Europe (AFME) and the Investment Association (IA) are continuing their campaign for a ...
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