© 2019 Learn to Trade Pty Ltd (ACN:138178542, AFSL:339557) provides general information and educational courses and materials only. This is not an offer to buy/sell financial products. We do not provide personal advice nor do we consider the needs, objectives or circumstances of any individual. Financial products are complex and all entail risk of loss. Over-the-counter derivative and foreign exchange products are considered speculative because they are highly leveraged and carry risk of loss beyond your initial investment, hence should only be traded with capital you can afford to lose. Please ensure you obtain professional advice to ensure trading or investing in any financial products is suitable for your circumstances, and ensure you obtain, read and understand any applicable offer document.


If traders are positive on the prospects for the Yen, they would expect the number on the right to go down – i.e. the Yen would be getting stronger against the Dollar. Traders would be buying less Yen with a Dollar as the Yen got stronger. Similarly, if the Yen was expected to weaken, forex traders would expect the Yen number to go up, reflecting the fact that the dollar could buy more yen.

The market then wants to trigger one of your pending orders but you may not have enough Forex free margin in your account. That pending order will either not be triggered or will be cancelled automatically. This can cause some traders to think that their broker failed to carry out their orders. Of course in this instance, this just isn't true. It's simply because the trader didn't have enough free margin in their trading account.
As you may now come to understand, FX margins are one of the key aspects of Forex trading that must not be overlooked, as they can potentially lead to unpleasant outcomes. In order to avoid them, you should understand the theory concerning margins, margin levels and margin calls, and apply your trading experience to create a viable Forex strategy. Indeed a well developed approach will undoubtedly lead you to trading success in the end.
© 2019 Learn to Trade Pty Ltd (ACN:138178542, AFSL:339557) provides general information and educational courses and materials only. This is not an offer to buy/sell financial products. We do not provide personal advice nor do we consider the needs, objectives or circumstances of any individual. Financial products are complex and all entail risk of loss. Over-the-counter derivative and foreign exchange products are considered speculative because they are highly leveraged and carry risk of loss beyond your initial investment, hence should only be traded with capital you can afford to lose. Please ensure you obtain professional advice to ensure trading or investing in any financial products is suitable for your circumstances, and ensure you obtain, read and understand any applicable offer document.
Retail or beginning traders often trade currency in micro lots, because one pip in a micro lot represents only a 10-cent move in the price. This makes losses easier to manage if a trade doesn't produce the intended results. In a mini lot, one pip equals $1 and that same one pip in a standard lot equals $10. Some currencies move as much as 100 pips or more in a single trading session making the potential losses to the small investor much more manageable by trading in micro or mini lots.
76% of retail accounts lose money when trading CFDs with this provider. CFDs are complex instruments and come with a high risk of losing money rapidly due to leverage. 76% of retail investor accounts lose money when trading CFDs with this provider. You should consider whether you understand how CFDs work and whether you can afford to take the high risk of losing your money.
If you sell a security short, you must have sufficient equity in your account to cover any fees associated with borrowing the security. If you borrow the security through us, we will borrow the security on your behalf and your account must have sufficient collateral to cover the margin requirements of the short sale. To cover administrative fees and stock borrowing fees, we must post 102% of the value of the security borrowed as collateral with the lender. In instances in which the security shorted is hard to borrow, borrowing fees charged by the lender may be so high (greater than the interest earned) that the short seller must pay additional interest for the privilege of borrowing a security. Customers may view the indicative short stock interest rates for a specific stock through the Short Stock (SLB) Availability tool located in the Tools section of their Account Management page. For more information concerning shorting stocks and associated fees, visit our Stock Shorting page.
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